Second Story Gallery 

CURRENT SHOW

Co-op Members and Collaborators Exhibition

The Second Story Gallery, an artist-run cooperative gallery located in the Healing Center in New Orleans’ burgeoning St. Claude Arts District presents a group exhibition of members and friends titled “Coop Members and Collaborators.” The artists featured are Luis Cruz Azacetas, Ron G. Bennett, Amy Bryan, Jane Hill, Sara Saharah Hollis, Natori Green, Jeremy Jones, Gina Laguna, Lauren Laguna, Charles M. Lovell, Cynthia Ramirez, Jackie Rawls, Julie Romain, and Maddie Stratton.

 

The exhibition runs from July 14th to August 25th 2018.  An opening reception will be held at the Second Story Gallery of the New Orleans Healing Center on Saturday July 14th from 6 to 9:30 P.M., in conjunction with St. Claude Arts District Second Saturdays.

PICTURES OF GALLERY


 

 CURRENT MEMBERS

Charles Lovell

Gina Laguna

Amy Bryan

Natori Green

Jessica Normington

Ron Bennett

Sara Hollis

Cynthia Ramirez

 

Thirty New Orleans Artists for Tricentennial

The Second Story Gallery is pleased to announce an open call for THIRTY NEW ORLEANS ARTISTS, an open call for New Orleans Visual Artists working in 2d and 3d,  to be juried by Gia Hamilton, Director of the Joan Mitchell Center; Charlie Tatum, Editorial Manager of the Pelican Bomb, and Emily Wilkerson, Independent Curator.  This exhibition highlights the many contributions of our contemporary visual artists during New Orleans’ 300-year anniversary celebration.

Artist Call Link To Enter:  https://www.callforentry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=5430

The exhibition Thirty New Orleans Artists will be held from September 8 to November 3, 2018, in the Second Story Gallery and is a visual arts program of the City of New Orleans’ Tricentennial Celebration.  New Orleans has been recognized nationally as an arts center; in July 2015 Hyperallergic reported that New Orleans was rated as the best city for creative workers. The city attracted noted artists to the French Quarter in the past century, commercial galleries continue to flourish on Julia Street in the Warehouse and CBD Arts District, while in the years since Hurricane Katrina, there has been an explosion of art galleries and artists spaces in the Marigny and Bywater neighborhoods—in the St. Claude Arts District.  Barrister’s Gallery, Second Story Gallery, Staple Goods Gallery, The Front, Good Children Gallery, Antenna, UNO St. Claude Gallery, Parse, Level Art Collective, Catylyst Collective, Politico Pop-Up and the New Orleans Arts Center are just a few of the 30-plus venues that currently showcase this dynamic emerging contemporary art scene.  The Joan Mitchell Center, Prospect New Orleans, and Pelican Bomb where the jurors have recently worked represent three important contemporary art organizations that have led to the artistic rebirth of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.  It is hoped the resulting exhibition will reflect the resilience, multiculturalism and dynamism of the visual arts in New Orleans in the year 2018, during an important historical moment.

Venue

The location for the exhibition is the Second Story Gallery, an artist-run cooperative gallery located in the Healing Center in New Orleans’ burgeoning St. Claude Arts District. The Second Story Gallery offers over 1,500 square feet of gallery space at 2372 St. Claude Ave., on the corner of St. Claude and St. Roch, directly across from the St. Roch Market.

The St. Claude Arts District—an eclectic alternative art scene downriver from the French Quarter—is exploding with energy during our city’s Tricentennial celebration.

Thirty New Orleans Artists Jurors:

Gia M. Hamilton is known for her visionary ability to identify and cultivate support systems. A cultural steward, design thinker and applied anthropologist, Hamilton has spent the last two decades straddling the nonprofit world and corporate America, leveraging her expertise in resource-based economic strategy to move forward new models in capacity building and fundraising. As a model builder, Hamilton  co-founded an independent African-centered school, Little Maroons, in 2006; later, she opened an intersectional incubator space, Gris Gris Lab, in 2009 and currently leads the Joan Mitchell Center artist residency program. As the Center Director, Hamilton designed the program as a place-based, community-centered laboratory for visual artists, curators and the creative community with the belief that imagination and creativity are paramount to creating a more equitable and socially just society.

Charlie Tatum is a writer and arts worker based in New Orleans. He currently works as Editorial and Communications Manager at Pelican Bomb. He received a BA in art history from New York University in 2011. In addition to contributing regularly to Pelican Bomb’s Art Review, he has written essays and conducted interviews for Art in America, Hyperallergic, Temporary Art Review and Burnaway, and has contributed to catalogs published by Prospect New Orleans, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, UB Art Galleries and the Charlotte Street Foundation. He has previously held positions with Prospect New Orleans, the Whitney Museum of American Art and Lombard Freid Gallery in New York.

Emily Wilkerson is a writer and curator based in New Orleans. Deeply engaged in the concerns and issues of her community, she enjoys writing about contemporary art as a departure point for exploring our shared social and cultural experiences around the globe. Wilkerson has contributed to publications including Pelican Bomb, Art Papers, Burnaway and the exhibition catalogs for Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp, Prospect.3: Notes for Now and Out of Easy Reach, and her ongoing research focuses on socially engaged art practices and the alternative educational strategies of international artist and curatorial residencies, the latter for which she was awarded the 2011–2012 Neely Macomber Travel Prize. She most recently served as Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs at Prospect New Orleans, and has worked on exhibitions and projects at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Chinati Foundation and the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, among others. She completed her Masters at the University of Southern California in Art and Curatorial Practices in the Public Sphere in Los Angeles in 2012 and holds a B.A. from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.

Thirty New Orleans Artists Calendar:

Call opens May 22

Call closes: 23rd at Midnight

Jury selection:  August 6

Artists’ notification:  August 7

Opening Reception and Awards Ceremony : Saturday, September 8, 6 PM to 9:30 PM

Gallery Hours, Free And Open TO THE PUBLIC, Monday to Sunday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Exhibition continues through November 3, 2018

Thirty New Orleans Artists will be selected for the final exhibition.

It is hoped the resulting exhibition will reflect the resilience, multiculturalism and dynamism of the visual arts in New Orleans in the year 2018, during the New Orleans Tricentennial.

 

BYLAWS

If you are interested in joining the Second Story Gallery, contact:
Charles Lovell at charleslovellart@gmail.com or 575.770.0095

By Laws (Framed by Andy P. Antippas, May, 2012, Changed by Charless Lovell, April 2018)

ARTICLE I: NAME and LOCATION

The full name of the artists’ cooperative, Second Story Gallery at New Orleans Healing Center, should be used on all advertising and announcements.

The Second Story Gallery (hereafter referred to as SSG) occupies a designated area on the second level of the New Orleans Healing Center (hereafter NOHC).

ARTICLE II: OBJECTIVES

Provide cooperative members with an opportunity to develop as visual artists by exhibiting and selling their work.

Exhibit members’ work in a professional and systematic manner, with openings on the second Saturday of the month (with exceptions for Mardi Gras and major special events) in conjunction with the tradition established by the other galleries in and around the St. Claude Arts District.

Offer artist members the opportunity to present an annual solo or two-person show, to contribute to the exhibition lineup through providing input and curation, and to display examples of their work in a secondary Gallery space.

ARTICLE III: RELATIONSHIP TO THE NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER

The SSG is a silo (tenant) of the NOHC. As such, it is represented by a Gallery Director reporting to the NOHC Executive Director.

Any issues or disputes occurring among or between Co-op members are to be resolved by a simple majority vote of the members in good standing (hereafter MIGS.) The Gallery Director and NOHC Executive Director will work to resolve any issues regarding Gallery operations. The Board of the NOHC is the final arbiter in any disputes that may occur between the SSG and the other NOHC silos.

Members of the SSG must indicate their awareness of and adherence to the NOHC Mission and Vision Statement by signing it (found below). They must also sign the NOHC’s Waiver of Liability (also found below).

ARTICLE IV: MEMBERSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES

MIGS will vote to determine the number of members in the Co-op; however, the membership should not fall below ten (10).

Co-op MIGS will vet applicants for membership. Current MIGS are exempt from a formal vetting process. New members are those who receive a majority of the MIGS’ votes and sign the acknowledgment of SSG Bylaws, NOHC Mission and Vision Statement, NOHC Waiver of Liability, and Lease/Rental Agreement.

Application Process

Artists who are residents of New Orleans and environs who wish to be considered for membership in the Second Story Gallery and who are in accord with our Bylaws and Lease/Rental Agreement and with the NOHC Waiver of Liability and Mission and Vision Statement can submit their name, physical and email addresses, a résumé, a note of their principal medium, an artist’s statement, a link to their website, and 10 to 15 images sized at 72dpi jpegs with 1500 pixels at longest side of their works to charleslovellart@gmail.org. Subject line: Second Story Gallery Application.

As soon as an opening occurs in the ranks, the SSG will advertise a call for artists and will notify applicants on file they are eligible for consideration. Applicants who are still interested may update their résumés and resend their updated material.

Decision Process

The Gallery Director will assemble all the submissions and distribute them to the membership. Co-op MIGS will review the applications and vote on new members, who will be chosen by a simple majority vote.

Membership in the SSG Co-op obligates the member to sign a one-year lease, effective from the date of sign-up.

Co-op members agree to contribute $75/month to the (approximately) $900/month rental of the designated art space, payable by the 5th of every month to the Gallery Director.  Current MIGS may be given a discount for their monthly fees. Dues may increase based on current economic factors; if so, any increase will be implemented at the beginning of the year.

Co-op members agree to place $150 (last month’s rent and damage deposit) in an escrow account held by the NOHC. At the termination of the lease, the damage deposit will be returned, unless the lease is broken, in which case remaining funds are forfeited.

The Gallery Director represents the Co-op members and reports to the Healing Center’s Executive Director.

The Gallery Director’s responsibilities are to collect the monthly fees and escrow; to have new members sign all membership documents (Bylaws, NOHC Mission and Vision Statement, NOHC Waiver of Liability, and Lease/Rental Agreement) and insure the documents are kept on file; to keep an updated membership and expense ledger for the SSG; to oversee the annual exhibition schedule; to assist members with installation, receptions, publicity, and social media; and to call and chair meetings and act as facilitator and mediator.

The Gallery Director will deposit the monthly fees and escrows in the NOHC bank account by the 10th of the month. The Gallery Director will exercise his/her judgment to permit a member to pay later than the prescribed time during valid emergency situations. Late payment is subject to a $25 penalty for first occurrence, $50 for second occurrence, and on third occurrence members will be considered to have violated their Lease/Rental Agreement and are subject to termination.

ARTICLE V: THE EXHIBITION SPACE

Each MIGS will be assigned one annual solo or two-person show. The monthly exhibition period will begin in January, with each member allotted one month. Group shows by members are arranged when possible.

Both the allocation of the exhibition months and the permanent personal exhibition areas will be done at a Co-op meeting with MIGS and the Gallery Director.

Any MIGS can bring a non-Co-op-member artist in to share their exhibition month without vetting or can curate a group exhibition in their annual slot.

The Gallery Director may book other exhibitions for a rental fee to museums, galleries, educational or cultural institutions as needed when members’ shows are not confirmed, with the goal of enhancing the artistic reputation of the SSG and maintaining financial viability.

The display of overtly “erotic” depictions is prohibited because the Second Story Gallery exists within a public space where parents frequently bring their children.

All exhibitions will open on the St. Claude Arts District’s Second Saturday and will end on the Saturday before the next Second Saturday, with Sunday devoted to deinstalling the show.

Exceptions to the Second Saturday opening date may occur when Mardi Gras falls on that weekend, or for major special events. All the galleries on St. Claude tend to move their openings to the following weekend, which means shows occurring during those time frames would be shorter than the others. The artist will make the final decision as to whether to change the opening date.

The openings will last from 6:00–9:00 p.m. The artist should consider having wine and bottled water for opening-night visitors. Finger food also may be provided by the artist. The set-up for receptions should be arranged in advance, and artists should be prepared to towel up any spilled substance from the floors. Reception trash should be bagged and left for the cleaning service at the end of the evening to be collected that Saturday night.

The artist is responsible for generating interest in his/her show through postcards, email blasts, social media, etc. The most critical press members to notify with listings, two weeks in advance of the opening, are Erik at erikhardt@gmail.com and listingsedit@gambitweekly.com, and Doug at doug_macCash@nola.com. A media list is available from the Gallery Director; however, because contact information can change, it is the artist’s responsibility to make sure they have the most current media contact information.

Although the NOHC is open from 9 a.m.–8 p.m. daily, the artist(s) on exhibit are encouraged to “gallery sit,” especially on afternoons and weekends, to see public reaction to their work and to make sales. The artist should visit his/her exhibition regularly to bring visitors and to assure the safety of his/her work.

Each artist should provide professional-quality labels with the title of the piece, medium, and price. The artist should place his/her contact information in plain view. All art on exhibit should be for sale. Sales made by and paid though the Gallery will result in a 40% commission to NOHC, with the artist paid his/her share one month after the sale is made. Artists who direct their own sales will provide a 20% commission to NOHC.

All art sold should be marked as sold (with a red dot) and remain in the exhibition until its conclusion. The artist is responsible for shipping any works if they are sold out of town.

At the conclusion of their shows, members are responsible for restoring the exhibition area to its original state: that is, all mounting or hanging devices should be removed and all holes sanded, spackled, and painted at the artist’s expense. Only the gallery-approved standard white paint may be used. A ladder is stored in the closet.

ARTICLE VI: TERMINATION–VOLUNTARY AND INVOLUNTARY

A Co-op member wishing to leave at the end of his/her lease period must notify, in writing, the Gallery Director and all members no later than one month before the lease expires. The Co-op members will undertake, through the proper vetting procedure, to replace the terminating member with an artist who has expressed an interest in joining.

A member may be terminated by a majority vote of the MIGS if the member fails to abide by the terms set forth in the Bylaws. A member may also be terminated if they refuse to maintain a positive relationship with their fellow artists or violate the spirit of the NOHC Mission. A member who is late paying their rent for three months may also be terminated.

Thanks to Andy Antippas from Barrister’s Gallery, New Orleans, author of the original Bylaws, many of which are still in use.

ARTICLE VII: AMENDMENTS TO THE BYLAWS

These Bylaws can be reviewed periodically and changed by the Healing Center Board if they prove to be impediments to the workings of the SSG Co-op.

Amendments may be added to the Bylaws by a 3/4 vote of the MIGS.

 

NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER MISSION AND VISION STATEMENT

MISSION

To provide a holistic, safe, sustainable center that heals, fulfills and empowers the individual and the community by providing services and programs promoting physical, nutritional, emotional, intellectual, environmental, economic and spiritual well-being.

VISION

Within the next four years, the New Orleans Healing Center (NOHC) will become a model for urban community healing around the world. With an overarching aim to revitalize and unify the seven (7) surrounding downtown neighborhoods, the NOHC will work fervently to ensure that the synergistic culture established will be a holistic and sustainable sanctuary to its community, the city, the region and visitors from throughout the world.

The NOHC will provide a full range of programs, services and products designed to enlighten and engage the minds, bodies and spirits of a diverse population while transforming and healing lives. The NOHC through its collaborative silos will stimulate economic and environmental development in the city and redefine how to “heal” a community.

The New Orleans Healing Center is well run by highly motivated leaders who bring the mission and vision to life; maintains and supports itself through a variety of creative avenues; serves visitors to its community and invites, accepts and appreciates the participation of others who benefit the community in benevolent ways; is honored and respected as a pioneering adventure, bringing new dynamics to the culture and community of New Orleans, especially the areas surrounding the center; and uses its leadership capabilities in a variety of ways to bring support and assistance to community members.

 

CURRENT SHOW

Woven: Recent Works of Amy Bryan and Natori Green 

New Orleans artists Amy Bryan and Natori Green will debut a two-person exhibition titled “Woven” at the Second Story Gallery in the New Orleans Healing Center. Amy Bryan and Natori Green are artists known for their dynamic depictions of people of color. They will feature mixed media pieces depicting womanhood and identity. The exhibition will run from May 12th to July 6th 2018. The opening reception will be held Saturday May 12th from 6 to 9PM 

Green states, “This two-person exhibition will display an exciting array of portraits and cultural references to the African diaspora while firmly having roots in New Orleans African American culture. My paintings were created by inspiration of contemporary African design and a strong longing to connect with the past and future of what it means to be African American. It weaves together research on cultures from the African diaspora such as the Regla de Ocha, Yoruba, and Creole heritage.”

Bryan states, “I will continue my series of small portrait drawings using paper, fabric, graphite, and ink. I portray imagined women and sometimes men with various moods and personalities.”

PICTURES OF GALLERY


 

 CURRENT MEMBERS

Charles Lovell

Gina Laguna

Amy Bryan

Natori Green

Jessica Normington

Ron Bennett

Sara Hollis

Cynthia Ramirez

 

Thirty New Orleans Artists for Tricentennial

The Second Story Gallery is pleased to announce an open call for THIRTY NEW ORLEANS ARTISTS, an open call for New Orleans Visual Artists working in 2d and 3d,  to be juried by Gia Hamilton, Director of the Joan Mitchell Center; Charlie Tatum, Editorial Manager of the Pelican Bomb, and Emily Wilkerson, Independent Curator.  This exhibition highlights the many contributions of our contemporary visual artists during New Orleans’ 300-year anniversary celebration.

Artist Call Link To Enter:  https://www.callforentry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=5430

The exhibition Thirty New Orleans Artists will be held from September 8 to November 3, 2018, in the Second Story Gallery and is a visual arts program of the City of New Orleans’ Tricentennial Celebration.  New Orleans has been recognized nationally as an arts center; in July 2015 Hyperallergic reported that New Orleans was rated as the best city for creative workers. The city attracted noted artists to the French Quarter in the past century, commercial galleries continue to flourish on Julia Street in the Warehouse and CBD Arts District, while in the years since Hurricane Katrina, there has been an explosion of art galleries and artists spaces in the Marigny and Bywater neighborhoods—in the St. Claude Arts District.  Barrister’s Gallery, Second Story Gallery, Staple Goods Gallery, The Front, Good Children Gallery, Antenna, UNO St. Claude Gallery, Parse, Level Art Collective, Catylyst Collective, Politico Pop-Up and the New Orleans Arts Center are just a few of the 30-plus venues that currently showcase this dynamic emerging contemporary art scene.  The Joan Mitchell Center, Prospect New Orleans, and Pelican Bomb where the jurors have recently worked represent three important contemporary art organizations that have led to the artistic rebirth of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.  It is hoped the resulting exhibition will reflect the resilience, multiculturalism and dynamism of the visual arts in New Orleans in the year 2018, during an important historical moment.

Venue

The location for the exhibition is the Second Story Gallery, an artist-run cooperative gallery located in the Healing Center in New Orleans’ burgeoning St. Claude Arts District. The Second Story Gallery offers over 1,500 square feet of gallery space at 2372 St. Claude Ave., on the corner of St. Claude and St. Roch, directly across from the St. Roch Market.

The St. Claude Arts District—an eclectic alternative art scene downriver from the French Quarter—is exploding with energy during our city’s Tricentennial celebration.

Thirty New Orleans Artists Jurors:

Gia M. Hamilton is known for her visionary ability to identify and cultivate support systems. A cultural steward, design thinker and applied anthropologist, Hamilton has spent the last two decades straddling the nonprofit world and corporate America, leveraging her expertise in resource-based economic strategy to move forward new models in capacity building and fundraising. As a model builder, Hamilton  co-founded an independent African-centered school, Little Maroons, in 2006; later, she opened an intersectional incubator space, Gris Gris Lab, in 2009 and currently leads the Joan Mitchell Center artist residency program. As the Center Director, Hamilton designed the program as a place-based, community-centered laboratory for visual artists, curators and the creative community with the belief that imagination and creativity are paramount to creating a more equitable and socially just society.

Charlie Tatum is a writer and arts worker based in New Orleans. He currently works as Editorial and Communications Manager at Pelican Bomb. He received a BA in art history from New York University in 2011. In addition to contributing regularly to Pelican Bomb’s Art Review, he has written essays and conducted interviews for Art in America, Hyperallergic, Temporary Art Review and Burnaway, and has contributed to catalogs published by Prospect New Orleans, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, UB Art Galleries and the Charlotte Street Foundation. He has previously held positions with Prospect New Orleans, the Whitney Museum of American Art and Lombard Freid Gallery in New York.

Emily Wilkerson is a writer and curator based in New Orleans. Deeply engaged in the concerns and issues of her community, she enjoys writing about contemporary art as a departure point for exploring our shared social and cultural experiences around the globe. Wilkerson has contributed to publications including Pelican Bomb, Art Papers, Burnaway and the exhibition catalogs for Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp, Prospect.3: Notes for Now and Out of Easy Reach, and her ongoing research focuses on socially engaged art practices and the alternative educational strategies of international artist and curatorial residencies, the latter for which she was awarded the 2011–2012 Neely Macomber Travel Prize. She most recently served as Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs at Prospect New Orleans, and has worked on exhibitions and projects at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Chinati Foundation and the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, among others. She completed her Masters at the University of Southern California in Art and Curatorial Practices in the Public Sphere in Los Angeles in 2012 and holds a B.A. from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.

Thirty New Orleans Artists Calendar:

Call opens May 22

Call closes: July 16

Jury selection:  August 6

Artists’ notification:  August 7

Opening Reception and Awards Ceremony : Saturday, September 8, 6 PM to 9:30 PM

Gallery Hours, Free And Open TO THE PUBLIC, Monday to Sunday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Exhibition continues through November 3, 2018

Thirty New Orleans Artists will be selected for the final exhibition.

It is hoped the resulting exhibition will reflect the resilience, multiculturalism and dynamism of the visual arts in New Orleans in the year 2018, during the New Orleans Tricentennial.

 

BYLAWS

If you are interested in joining the Second Story Gallery, contact:
Charles Lovell at charleslovellart@gmail.com or 575.770.0095

By Laws (Framed by Andy P. Antippas, May, 2012, Changed by Charless Lovell, April 2018)

ARTICLE I: NAME and LOCATION

The full name of the artists’ cooperative, Second Story Gallery at New Orleans Healing Center, should be used on all advertising and announcements.

The Second Story Gallery (hereafter referred to as SSG) occupies a designated area on the second level of the New Orleans Healing Center (hereafter NOHC).

ARTICLE II: OBJECTIVES

Provide cooperative members with an opportunity to develop as visual artists by exhibiting and selling their work.

Exhibit members’ work in a professional and systematic manner, with openings on the second Saturday of the month (with exceptions for Mardi Gras and major special events) in conjunction with the tradition established by the other galleries in and around the St. Claude Arts District.

Offer artist members the opportunity to present an annual solo or two-person show, to contribute to the exhibition lineup through providing input and curation, and to display examples of their work in a secondary Gallery space.

ARTICLE III: RELATIONSHIP TO THE NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER

The SSG is a silo (tenant) of the NOHC. As such, it is represented by a Gallery Director reporting to the NOHC Executive Director.

Any issues or disputes occurring among or between Co-op members are to be resolved by a simple majority vote of the members in good standing (hereafter MIGS.) The Gallery Director and NOHC Executive Director will work to resolve any issues regarding Gallery operations. The Board of the NOHC is the final arbiter in any disputes that may occur between the SSG and the other NOHC silos.

Members of the SSG must indicate their awareness of and adherence to the NOHC Mission and Vision Statement by signing it (found below). They must also sign the NOHC’s Waiver of Liability (also found below).

ARTICLE IV: MEMBERSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES

MIGS will vote to determine the number of members in the Co-op; however, the membership should not fall below ten (10).

Co-op MIGS will vet applicants for membership. Current MIGS are exempt from a formal vetting process. New members are those who receive a majority of the MIGS’ votes and sign the acknowledgment of SSG Bylaws, NOHC Mission and Vision Statement, NOHC Waiver of Liability, and Lease/Rental Agreement.

Application Process

Artists who are residents of New Orleans and environs who wish to be considered for membership in the Second Story Gallery and who are in accord with our Bylaws and Lease/Rental Agreement and with the NOHC Waiver of Liability and Mission and Vision Statement can submit their name, physical and email addresses, a résumé, a note of their principal medium, an artist’s statement, a link to their website, and 10 to 15 images sized at 72dpi jpegs with 1500 pixels at longest side of their works to charleslovellart@gmail.org. Subject line: Second Story Gallery Application.

As soon as an opening occurs in the ranks, the SSG will advertise a call for artists and will notify applicants on file they are eligible for consideration. Applicants who are still interested may update their résumés and resend their updated material.

Decision Process

The Gallery Director will assemble all the submissions and distribute them to the membership. Co-op MIGS will review the applications and vote on new members, who will be chosen by a simple majority vote.

Membership in the SSG Co-op obligates the member to sign a one-year lease, effective from the date of sign-up.

Co-op members agree to contribute $75/month to the (approximately) $900/month rental of the designated art space, payable by the 5th of every month to the Gallery Director.  Current MIGS may be given a discount for their monthly fees. Dues may increase based on current economic factors; if so, any increase will be implemented at the beginning of the year.

Co-op members agree to place $150 (last month’s rent and damage deposit) in an escrow account held by the NOHC. At the termination of the lease, the damage deposit will be returned, unless the lease is broken, in which case remaining funds are forfeited.

The Gallery Director represents the Co-op members and reports to the Healing Center’s Executive Director.

The Gallery Director’s responsibilities are to collect the monthly fees and escrow; to have new members sign all membership documents (Bylaws, NOHC Mission and Vision Statement, NOHC Waiver of Liability, and Lease/Rental Agreement) and insure the documents are kept on file; to keep an updated membership and expense ledger for the SSG; to oversee the annual exhibition schedule; to assist members with installation, receptions, publicity, and social media; and to call and chair meetings and act as facilitator and mediator.

The Gallery Director will deposit the monthly fees and escrows in the NOHC bank account by the 10th of the month. The Gallery Director will exercise his/her judgment to permit a member to pay later than the prescribed time during valid emergency situations. Late payment is subject to a $25 penalty for first occurrence, $50 for second occurrence, and on third occurrence members will be considered to have violated their Lease/Rental Agreement and are subject to termination.

ARTICLE V: THE EXHIBITION SPACE

Each MIGS will be assigned one annual solo or two-person show. The monthly exhibition period will begin in January, with each member allotted one month. Group shows by members are arranged when possible.

Both the allocation of the exhibition months and the permanent personal exhibition areas will be done at a Co-op meeting with MIGS and the Gallery Director.

Any MIGS can bring a non-Co-op-member artist in to share their exhibition month without vetting or can curate a group exhibition in their annual slot.

The Gallery Director may book other exhibitions for a rental fee to museums, galleries, educational or cultural institutions as needed when members’ shows are not confirmed, with the goal of enhancing the artistic reputation of the SSG and maintaining financial viability.

The display of overtly “erotic” depictions is prohibited because the Second Story Gallery exists within a public space where parents frequently bring their children.

All exhibitions will open on the St. Claude Arts District’s Second Saturday and will end on the Saturday before the next Second Saturday, with Sunday devoted to deinstalling the show.

Exceptions to the Second Saturday opening date may occur when Mardi Gras falls on that weekend, or for major special events. All the galleries on St. Claude tend to move their openings to the following weekend, which means shows occurring during those time frames would be shorter than the others. The artist will make the final decision as to whether to change the opening date.

The openings will last from 6:00–9:00 p.m. The artist should consider having wine and bottled water for opening-night visitors. Finger food also may be provided by the artist. The set-up for receptions should be arranged in advance, and artists should be prepared to towel up any spilled substance from the floors. Reception trash should be bagged and left for the cleaning service at the end of the evening to be collected that Saturday night.

The artist is responsible for generating interest in his/her show through postcards, email blasts, social media, etc. The most critical press members to notify with listings, two weeks in advance of the opening, are Erik at erikhardt@gmail.com and listingsedit@gambitweekly.com, and Doug at doug_macCash@nola.com. A media list is available from the Gallery Director; however, because contact information can change, it is the artist’s responsibility to make sure they have the most current media contact information.

Although the NOHC is open from 9 a.m.–8 p.m. daily, the artist(s) on exhibit are encouraged to “gallery sit,” especially on afternoons and weekends, to see public reaction to their work and to make sales. The artist should visit his/her exhibition regularly to bring visitors and to assure the safety of his/her work.

Each artist should provide professional-quality labels with the title of the piece, medium, and price. The artist should place his/her contact information in plain view. All art on exhibit should be for sale. Sales made by and paid though the Gallery will result in a 40% commission to NOHC, with the artist paid his/her share one month after the sale is made. Artists who direct their own sales will provide a 20% commission to NOHC.

All art sold should be marked as sold (with a red dot) and remain in the exhibition until its conclusion. The artist is responsible for shipping any works if they are sold out of town.

At the conclusion of their shows, members are responsible for restoring the exhibition area to its original state: that is, all mounting or hanging devices should be removed and all holes sanded, spackled, and painted at the artist’s expense. Only the gallery-approved standard white paint may be used. A ladder is stored in the closet.

ARTICLE VI: TERMINATION–VOLUNTARY AND INVOLUNTARY

A Co-op member wishing to leave at the end of his/her lease period must notify, in writing, the Gallery Director and all members no later than one month before the lease expires. The Co-op members will undertake, through the proper vetting procedure, to replace the terminating member with an artist who has expressed an interest in joining.

A member may be terminated by a majority vote of the MIGS if the member fails to abide by the terms set forth in the Bylaws. A member may also be terminated if they refuse to maintain a positive relationship with their fellow artists or violate the spirit of the NOHC Mission. A member who is late paying their rent for three months may also be terminated.

Thanks to Andy Antippas from Barrister’s Gallery, New Orleans, author of the original Bylaws, many of which are still in use.

ARTICLE VII: AMENDMENTS TO THE BYLAWS

These Bylaws can be reviewed periodically and changed by the Healing Center Board if they prove to be impediments to the workings of the SSG Co-op.

Amendments may be added to the Bylaws by a 3/4 vote of the MIGS.

 

NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER MISSION AND VISION STATEMENT

MISSION

To provide a holistic, safe, sustainable center that heals, fulfills and empowers the individual and the community by providing services and programs promoting physical, nutritional, emotional, intellectual, environmental, economic and spiritual well-being.

VISION

Within the next four years, the New Orleans Healing Center (NOHC) will become a model for urban community healing around the world. With an overarching aim to revitalize and unify the seven (7) surrounding downtown neighborhoods, the NOHC will work fervently to ensure that the synergistic culture established will be a holistic and sustainable sanctuary to its community, the city, the region and visitors from throughout the world.

The NOHC will provide a full range of programs, services and products designed to enlighten and engage the minds, bodies and spirits of a diverse population while transforming and healing lives. The NOHC through its collaborative silos will stimulate economic and environmental development in the city and redefine how to “heal” a community.

The New Orleans Healing Center is well run by highly motivated leaders who bring the mission and vision to life; maintains and supports itself through a variety of creative avenues; serves visitors to its community and invites, accepts and appreciates the participation of others who benefit the community in benevolent ways; is honored and respected as a pioneering adventure, bringing new dynamics to the culture and community of New Orleans, especially the areas surrounding the center; and uses its leadership capabilities in a variety of ways to bring support and assistance to community members.